Reynard the Foxe, William Caxton Translation, The Kelmscott Press (1892)

Reynard the Foxe is the main character in a set of fables and stories stretching back nearly one thousand years, themselves often deriving from even older animal stories written in medieval Latin, mostly written by various (and often anonymous) authors across Europe. It is the most famous of beast epics, with animals playing human roles, a genre very popular in the early middle ages, especially as a means of satirizing the … Continue reading Reynard the Foxe, William Caxton Translation, The Kelmscott Press (1892)

The English Bible in the John Rylands Library, by Richard Lovett, Privately Published, 1899

{Ed. Note: This article is from Books and Vines contributor dlphcoracl.} When thinking of the great libraries in Great Britain one inevitably thinks of the British Library and the libraries at the two great British universities: University of Oxford (the Bodleian Libraries) and Cambridge University (Cambridge University Libraries and the Fitzwilliam Museum Reference Library).  However, unjustly neglected in this thinking is the superb library at … Continue reading The English Bible in the John Rylands Library, by Richard Lovett, Privately Published, 1899

The Dictes and Sayings of the Philosophers, Anthony Woodville, Lord Rivers, The Cranbrook Press (1901)

George Booth (1864-1949) was co-founder and editor of the Detroit Evening News, a noted philanthropist, and a passionate follower of the Arts and Crafts movement.  Booth founded the Cranbrook Press (named after a picturesque and idyllic small town in England where Booth’s father and grandfather were born) in 1900 with a purpose to “print a few books that would last for all time.”  Booth wrote in … Continue reading The Dictes and Sayings of the Philosophers, Anthony Woodville, Lord Rivers, The Cranbrook Press (1901)

The Great Illustrated Private Press Books, Part III – The Fables of Esope, Gregynog Press

{Ed. Note: This is the third in a series on ‘The Great Illustrated Private Press Books‘ by Books and Vines Contributor dlphcoracl.  Part I is here and Part II is here.} In the most recent installment of this series, featuring the 1973 Officina Bodoni edition of The Fables of Aesop, astute Books and Vines readers will have noted that I stated within the introduction: ‘Aesop’s Fables’ is firmly ensconced … Continue reading The Great Illustrated Private Press Books, Part III – The Fables of Esope, Gregynog Press

The Great Illustrated Private Press Books, Part II – Officina Bodoni’s The Fables of Aesop (1973)

{Ed. Note: This is the second of an on-going series looking at the greatest of all private press illustrated books of the last 120+ years. This article is provided by Books and Vines contributor Dlphcoracl. A few weeks back in a review of the Grabhorn Press Esope, we mentioned the Officina Bodoni’s stunning 1973 edition of The Fables of Aesop. Here is it for your perusal!} Aesop is … Continue reading The Great Illustrated Private Press Books, Part II – Officina Bodoni’s The Fables of Aesop (1973)

The Fables of Esope, Grabhorn Press, Illustrations by Valenti Angelo (1930)

Aesop’s existence, while likely, is not completely certain, though writings about him are found in such sources as Aristotle, Herodotus, and Plutarch. Apparently he lived in ancient Greece around 600 BC. It was long said that he was a slave who won his freedom by his cleverness. No direct writings of his survive, though many tales over the centuries and across cultures have been attributed to him. In fact, as … Continue reading The Fables of Esope, Grabhorn Press, Illustrations by Valenti Angelo (1930)