Utopia, Sir Thomas More, Designed by Bruce Rogers and Printed at William Rudge Press for the Limited Editions Club (1935)

A couple weeks ago, Book and Vines took a look at a work from one of America’s greatest twentieth century book designers, John Henry Nash, that being the 1939 Limited Editions Club (LEC) edition of Religio Medici by Sir Thomas Browne. We now take a look at a work from a contemporary of Nash, and one that arguably was the greatest of all American book designers … Continue reading Utopia, Sir Thomas More, Designed by Bruce Rogers and Printed at William Rudge Press for the Limited Editions Club (1935)

Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, by Lewis Carroll, Illustrations by John Tenniel, Limited Editions Club (1932, 1935)

There is no question that the three most desirable titles, from a collectors standpoint, of the George Macy Limited Editions Club (LEC) era are the Picasso illustrated and signed Lysistrata from Aristophanes, James Joyce‘s Ulysses with illustrations and signature of Henri Matisse (some with Joyce’s signature also) and the Lewis Carroll ‘set’ of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. The desirability of these titles have less … Continue reading Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, by Lewis Carroll, Illustrations by John Tenniel, Limited Editions Club (1932, 1935)

Leaves of Grass, by Walt Whitman, Limited Editions Club (1929) and Peter Pauper Press (1950)

{Ed. Note: This post has been updated to include some pictures, thanks to Books and Vines contributor DlphcOrcl, of the 1940 Doubleday Doran edition mentioned in the article below. These newly added pictures are at the bottom of the article.} Books and Vines has shown a lot of love to Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, and I want to continue that one more time! The very … Continue reading Leaves of Grass, by Walt Whitman, Limited Editions Club (1929) and Peter Pauper Press (1950)

Alphabetum Romanum, by Felice Feliciano Veronese, Officina Bodoni (1960)

{Ed. Note: This is the latest article from Books and Vines contributor Neil.} Giovanni Mardersteig, who will always be associated with the great traditions of typography, wrote this short credo on printing : First, service to the author, searching for the form best suited to his theme.  Second, service to the reader, making reading as pleasant and light for him as possible.  Third, the giving of … Continue reading Alphabetum Romanum, by Felice Feliciano Veronese, Officina Bodoni (1960)