Robert the Devil, The Windhover Press at the University of Iowa (1981)

Robert the Devil is an anonymous medieval legend, apparently originating in 13th century France, about a knight who, due to his mother making a pact with the devil, is born as the son of satan. He leads a life of extensive plunder and debauchery, and is feared and hated. One day he becomes self-aware of what a horrible person he is, asks the pope for forgiveness … Continue reading Robert the Devil, The Windhover Press at the University of Iowa (1981)

The Circus of Dr. Lao, by Charles Finney, Janus Press (1984); Also, The Limited Editions Club edition (1982)

One would think, having lived in Arizona for 43 years, that I would be more familiar with Charles G. Finney‘s modern classic The Circus of Dr. Lao which takes place in a fictional small town in Arizona named Abalone. Alas, I have never read it. I intended to do so prior to writing this article, but I remain buried in higher priority reading. None-the-less, the fine press editions … Continue reading The Circus of Dr. Lao, by Charles Finney, Janus Press (1984); Also, The Limited Editions Club edition (1982)

The Tragedie of King Lear, by William Shakespeare, Janus Press/Theodore Press (1986)

{Ed. Note: Several comments from Claire Van Vliet (in quotation marks) are taken from an interview and article by Candace Page, published in the Burlington Free Press on March 2, 2013.   Ms. Page’s excellent article can be read in its entirety by clicking here.} Claire Van Vliet, now eighty years old, is a master wood-engraver although she also makes prints, drawings and pulp paintings.  She … Continue reading The Tragedie of King Lear, by William Shakespeare, Janus Press/Theodore Press (1986)

An Essay on Typography, by Eric Gill, Sheed and Ward (1931)

{Ed. Note: This article is from Books and Vines contributor Neil.} Eric Gill (1882-1940) was one of the greatest English artist-craftsmen of the twentieth century: a calligrapher, Illustrator, letter-cutter, mason, sculptor, stamp-designer, teacher, typographer, wood-engraver and writer. He was also a man of contradictions and reconciling the paradox of Gill the artist, Gill the deeply religious man who converted to Roman Catholicism with Gill the man can be difficult (for instance, see … Continue reading An Essay on Typography, by Eric Gill, Sheed and Ward (1931)

Alphabetum Romanum, by Felice Feliciano Veronese, Officina Bodoni (1960)

{Ed. Note: This is the latest article from Books and Vines contributor Neil.} Giovanni Mardersteig, who will always be associated with the great traditions of typography, wrote this short credo on printing : First, service to the author, searching for the form best suited to his theme.  Second, service to the reader, making reading as pleasant and light for him as possible.  Third, the giving of … Continue reading Alphabetum Romanum, by Felice Feliciano Veronese, Officina Bodoni (1960)