A Look at Film and Classic Literature

{Ed. Note: This is an article from guest contributor Robert D. Bailey.  Mr. Bailey has had a long and successful career in the film industry, mostly in visual effects (including matte photography for Blade Runner and matte camera for Dances with Wolves, though also as a director, producer, writer and editor.} Film and literature have had a long and often contentious relationship. Many classic films … Continue reading A Look at Film and Classic Literature

Shakespeare on Stage and Screen

{Ed. Note: This is a guest article from Books and Vines reader Scholasticus. I took his advice on a couple recommendations below and agree the productions are spectacular! These are highly recommended.}   Shakespeare is one of the most popular English authors: many studies and surveys reiterate the fact that his works are among the most frequently printed and read after the Bible. To read Shakespeare is … Continue reading Shakespeare on Stage and Screen

The Leopard, a film by Luchino Visconti (1963)

{Ed. Note: A couple weeks back, Books and Vines took a look at the great Italian novel The Leopard, by Giuseppe di Lampedusa. The Leopard is one of the few great works of literature that made the transition to the big screen in a manner which, at least artistically, is not terribly disappointing and, in fact, can stand on its own as a great work. The … Continue reading The Leopard, a film by Luchino Visconti (1963)

Before Midnight, Directed by Richard Linklater (2013)

For those who like smart dialogue of the quality that usually is only found in fine literature, is there a greater trilogy than that of Richard Linklater’s series of Before Sunrise (1995), Before Sunset (2004) and Before Midnight (2013)?  All three films star Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy. The nine year spacing of the films is simply perfect and shows, as true to life as ever done on … Continue reading Before Midnight, Directed by Richard Linklater (2013)

Diabolique, a film by by Henri-Georges Clouzot, Criterion Collection (1955)

A number of weeks back I highlighted a fantastic film from 1953, The Wages of Fear, by the great French director Henri-Georges Clouzot. Great as that film is, and it is absolutely great, I was unprepared for the heights that Clouzot was able to attain with his classic 1955 film, Les Diaboliques (released as Diabolique in the United States). Starring Simone Signoret as Nicole Horner, … Continue reading Diabolique, a film by by Henri-Georges Clouzot, Criterion Collection (1955)

Seven Samurai, a film by Akira Kurosawa, Criterion Collection (1957)

Seven Samurai (Shichinin no Samurai), co-written, edited, and directed by Akira Kurosawa, is considered one of the greatest films ever made, has had a tremendous influence on world cinema, and is arguably the most well-known and popular Japanese film to have made it into the Western world. Taking place in 1587, the film’s story is pretty simple, belying its deep complexity and masterly execution. A village of farmers, extremely … Continue reading Seven Samurai, a film by Akira Kurosawa, Criterion Collection (1957)

La dolce vita, Directed by Federico Fellini (1960)

Federico Fellini’s La dolce vita is considered one of the greatest films in the history of world cinema. Starring Marcello Mastroianni as Marcello Rubini, a writer/journalist casually in search of love and happiness which proves elusive, the film won the Palme d’Or at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival.  La dolce vita bridges Fellini’s earlier neo-realist period with his later art films. The film highlights the decadence and … Continue reading La dolce vita, Directed by Federico Fellini (1960)